Wedding photographer logo and branding

This geometric pattern, formed by the facets of a diamond, represents “clarity”, “quality”, and “ever lasting”. The use of a geometric form reflects the precision and craft of photography.

logo-03-card-black
Embossed business card and a paper design I found online

3-print-envelop
Die-cut print folder

3-stamp
Rubber stamp to add a hallmark to prints

logo-03-usb
USB box

logo-03-card
Altermate business card embossed on white

logo-03-wax-seal
Wax seal

logo-03-card-black-alt
Alt font

Responsive web design – sarahburgessyoga.com

I’ve had my first play with responsive web design and CSS, which was great fun.

Sarah Burgess Yoga website design

This new site for yoga teacher Sarah Burgess is to provide information and class schedules for her yoga practice. It was designed to be friendly, informal, and uses “in-situ” photography of Sarah doing yoga as a main focal point.

Responsive WordPress theme customisation

I designed the site and customised a theme in WordPress which was used as framework for the content and to make updates easy. I used the theme “Twenty twelve” as a base. It’s a responsive theme created by WordPress’ in-house team and is a great foundation for exploring media queries and getting into designing layouts optimised for mobile, tablet and large screens. It is interesting in that it loads the CSS in the functions.php, rather than in the header.

Sarah Burgess Yoga responsive web design for mobile and tablet

For the full screen background slideshow I used the excellent MaxImage by Aaron Vanderzwan. I found this to be the most reliable and platform agnostic. This meant that I had to add the slideshow code directly to the .php files rather than using a WordPress plugin, which I found either didn’t work very well or slowed the site down too much.

 

Last.fm 10 years of scrobbling logo

Last.fm 10 years of scrobbles logo

 

The Audioscrobbler software is 10 years old and Last.fm is celebrating this revolutionary innovation.
The logo takes elements from exisiting branding assets.

Sketch

10 years of scrobbles logo sketch

scrobble: skrob·bul (ˈskrɒbəll) [verb]
To automatically add the tracks you play to your Last.fm profile with a piece of software called a Scrobbler
If I’m not scrobbling the music I hear, it doesn’t count!

Scrobbler tablet & mobile music app design – icon family V1

Following the iOS design principle of “do one thing really well” we decided to spilt the Last.fm service into three distinct apps which serve clearly different use: radio streaming, exploring and scrobbling your music collection, and finding events to see. This meant coming up with a family of icons that were different enough to be distinct, yet belonged together and clearly reflected the brand.

The solution was inspired in part by the style of exisiting brand illustrations, but simplified and using geometric shapes. Each icon has a loose concept:

Radio: (Obvious!) is personal radio, so radiating waves… no brainer.
Scrobbler: The Scrobbler enhances your local music collection with Last.fm UGC tagging data and creates automated personal playlists. The icon shows inverted triangles, representing  focusing lots of music down to the point of the tracks you really want to listen to.
Events: The icon shows a horizon with points radiating out, representing the points of a globe where you can see your music live.

Electronic music site logo – 3rd iteration

In the second iteration I was asked to try a more minimal logo based around the “J”. We also had a font we really liked called Chalet London 1970 by House Industries.

The client liked the last two ideas, a combination of the clean J shape with a bit of movement.

After some thought, the client decided they actually quite like the rotated “J” logo, an wanted to see some development on that version with colour option. Nearly there. Replaced the funky Chalet “S” with a customised “S” from Lucida.

JustGo Music logo colour samples

Electronic music site logo – sketches

I’ve been working on the branding of a new product creating a social space for the electronic dance music scene.

The current logo is the old "grpahic equaliser" - I developed that into a more abstract waveform, that then started to look look like the cut-out shape you see in a razor blade.

 

I have to get the whole DJ cliché out of the way. It was nice that the "J" could be worked into the arm of the deck.

 

Morphological matrix

After doing some research into the scene and some broad thinking on possible themes that might add personality to the brand, I start to sketch ideas using a “morphological matrix” as a way of organising the ideas, it also helps to make those lateral connections. Here’s the matrix as a whole…

Music brands (plus a couple that are not)

I’ve been collecting a board of brands, mostly around music. There’s a definite resurgence of the graphic logo rather than a logotype alone, which makes practical sense when it comes to designing a small graphic for an app icon (like the fin of Grooveshark, or the cloud of Soundcloud). Aweditorium got around this by emphasising “AWE” on their icon. You’re onto a winner if you can claim a single letter – and happne to be a dominant social network: “f”, “p”, “t”,”v”, and “w” are gone now of course ; )

I’m impressed by the stand-out of Pinterest’s cursive “p”, Beats Aduio circle, and the clarity of thisismyjam.com branding.

As well as researching music brands, I also find it’s good to have a set of brands to study and admire just because they’re cool.

Valentine’s Day Logo for Last.fm

Valentne's Day logo for Last.fm

Valentne's Day logo for Last.fm on black with white outline

A logo for a Valentine’s Day feature on Last.fm. I’m not very romantic and chintz makes me nauseous, so I wanted to avoid the cliches on this logo. As this was for a music site, I felt the Ziggy Stardust lightning bolt was a better representation of love than the typical Clintons Cards heart shape. I knew I’d found the right solution when someone commented “it looks like a heavy metal band logo!”.

The font is set in Eagle Black. The colour came about by chance… When you add a colour overlay to a layer in Adobe Photoshop, the application default colour it always applies is #ef4836 (M: 87% Y:84). I’ve always like that colour and wanted an excuse to use it.

Sketches for a new identity…



I love a challenge ; )

These are sketches for a professional identity for a friend who has a very diverse skill-set: massage therapist, yoga teacher and usability consultant.

The easy route would be to treat each strand separately. But that’s no fun. There was already a nice idea of using hands as a conceptual image for the massage, the leap was to tie that into “interaction and usabilty”… oh and “Yoga”.

As often happens, there was a bit of serendipity: earlier that week a colleague had introduced me to a really nice set of “gesturecons” (illustrations used in diagrams to demonstrate how to use software on touc-screen devices) for a user-flow diagram I was doing. Massage is about touch, so why not use gesturecons to illustrate massage movements?

Trying to tie this concept into yoga was a but more work. Then I remembered that in yoga books you often have figurative diagrams to demonstrate postures, and in yoga there are postures just for the hands, called “mudras”.

It seemed to fit quite nicely as an idea, hands that massage, a hand in a meditative mudra, and a hand performing an interactive gesture.

Drawing final Easy Gourmet logos in Adobe Illustrator

Easy Gourmet logo drawn in Adobe Illustrator

I spent some time last night drawing the final logo artwork for Easy Gourmet. The font is Bodoni Script Pro by Parachute, chosen for the classic heritage of Fuller Benton’s Bodoni, and the script fulfilled the client’s desire for curviness and femininity. I converted the font to outlines in Adobe Illustrator so I could attached the “Heart signature” to the flourish of the “G”.

Bézier Curves

If you’re unfamiliar with Bézier curves, they are tool to draw curves and make shapes in a computer. A shape in a drawing program, such as Abode Illustrator, is made of points called “vectors” connected by lines, called “paths”, and filled with either a colour or a blend of colours called “gradients”. Initially you draw a shape using a shape tool (ovals, rectangles) or using a virtual pen tool. To change or “edit” a shape you click on or near the edge of the shape, this brings up the points as little black squares, clicking on one of these squares reveals the “control points”, which are like little sea-saw levers. Over time, using these control levers becomes quite intuitive, although at first they can drive you nuts.

Spread of the Eyewitness Music book published by Dorling Kindersley
Spread of the Eyewitness Music book published by Dorling Kindersley

It’s a skill I picked up creating hundreds of clipping paths for images at Dorling Kindersley, where the famous style was text flowing around cut out images on white backgrounds. The only way to do this then was a cruder version of the curves in the “path” tool in Photoshop.

Bézier curves were developed by Pierre Bézier (Wikipedia), a French engineer who pioneered computer-aided design at Renault where the curves were used to design care bodies.

The Wikipedia page on Bézier curves has really nice animations on the maths behind the little handles and pivots you use to control the curve. I don’t understand them, but they are pretty in a geeky sort-of-way…

Quadratic Bézier curveQuadratic Bézier curveQuadratic Bézier curve

Easy Gourmet identity & logo

Easy Gourmet Catering logo, a cream heart etched in a black sauce

Monogram of E and G and a heart shape

Logo brand mark - a cream heart, etched into a fruit coulis

First iteration

In the photograph I was using to draw this logo, which represents the decoration made from a drop of cream in a fruit coulis, it looked like a leaf. They are in fact hearts. So I have updated my Illustrator rendering for this logo mark. The shape is more feminine now and will compliment the image of the (still secret) company and it’s owners. Original design is below.

Easy Gourmet dessert with cream in fruit coulis

Secret branding 1

Monograms

Monogram of E and G and a heart shape

Whenever I design a logo, I always look for an opportunity for a monogram.

Mongrams are great for extending the uses of a logo and if there’s a need for a smaller version, such as icons or badges and labels in the real world.

The example above is the identity I’m working on for a rather chic catering & events company, but I’m still not quite allowed to shout about it yet, I can’t help let a few ambiguous designs out of the bag ; )

Oh, it’s a heart not a leaf!

Logo brand mark - a cream heart, etched into a fruit coulis

In the photograph I was using to draw this logo, which represents the decoration made from a drop of cream in a fruit coulis, it looked like a leaf. They are in fact hearts. So I have updated my Illustrator rendering for this logo mark. The shape is more feminine now and will compliment the image of the (still secret) company and it’s owners. Original design is below.

Easy Gourmet dessert with cream in fruit coulis

Secret branding 1